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Kosovo accuses US, EU of pro-Serbian bias in negotiations

Kosovo’s prime minister on Thursday complained of bias against his country from the United States and the European Union and tolerance of what he called Serbia’s authoritarian regime.

Prime Minister Albin Kurti said his Cabinet took a different stance. “We insist that behaving well with an autocrat doesn’t make him behave better. On the contrary,” he said.

The U.S. and EU envoys for the Kosovo-Serbia talks — Gabriel Escobar and Miroslav Lajcak respectively — “come to us with demands, with requests of the other side,” he said in an interview with The Associated Press.

US ALLY REPORTEDLY CALLS BIDEN FOREIGN POLICY IN KOSOVO ‘NAIVE’ AMID RISING TENSIONS WITH SERBIA

After the soldiers were injured last week, NATO said it would send an additional 700 troops to northern Kosovo.

Wigemark said the time would come when EULEX civilian police, who no longer have executive powers but only “monitoring and mentoring Kosovo police,” wouldn’t be needed in Kosovo.

“But the conditions are not quite there yet,” he said.

Brussels has asked Kosovo to withdraw its special police forces from northern Kosovo, where most of the ethnic Serb minority lives, and to hold fresh elections.

In February and March, Kosovo and Serbia reached a EU-facilitated deal on normalizing relations, with an 11-point plan for implementation. The process remains the focus of the talks mediated by the envoys from Washington and Brussels.

Kurti insisted the special police forces could not be “downsized” until criminal Serb gangs either left the country or were arrested. He said there was peace in Kosovo if there were no “orders for violence from Belgrade.”

He said they urged Kosovo to make electoral amendments but did not put pressure on the ethnic Serbs’ only political party to take part in the vote.

He said he would need the international community’s help to foster political pluralism in the ethnic Serb minority “for a fair competition, for a democratic race for new mayors.”

“We cannot afford another process where Serbian candidates boycott it a couple of days before the elections start because that’s what Belgrade orders,” he said.

Serbia and its former province Kosovo have been at odds for decades, with Belgrade refusing to recognize Kosovo’s 2008 declaration of independence. The violence near their shared border has stirred fear of a renewal of a 1998-99 conflict in Kosovo that claimed more than 10,000 lives and resulted in the KFOR peacekeeping mission.

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